We recently had the pleasure of welcoming a 1943 Martin D-18 into the shop for some repair work. It’s always such a pleasure to have instruments like these around! Definitely some wow factor, and the utmost admiration for this era of Martin guitars.

 
 There were a couple small cracks that had formed between side braces. With the cracks glued and cleated for support it was time to deal with the finish coming up…

There were a couple small cracks that had formed between side braces. With the cracks glued and cleated for support it was time to deal with the finish coming up…

 As you can see the rib was showing signs of the lacquer separating from the wood in the waist area of the rib. Using a lacquer retarder base solution the finish melts pretty nicely back into itself making the hazing much less noticeable and helping it not to chip off.

As you can see the rib was showing signs of the lacquer separating from the wood in the waist area of the rib. Using a lacquer retarder base solution the finish melts pretty nicely back into itself making the hazing much less noticeable and helping it not to chip off.

 Looking Better!

Looking Better!

 We noticed the bridge was pulling up, so it was time for it to be removed. We have a few of these cardboard cutouts wrapped in foil laying around. Each with different shapes of bridges. I guess you could say this repair happens A Lot… This is used to shield the top and reflect light and heat away from the top except in the bridge area where we want to heat up the glue.

We noticed the bridge was pulling up, so it was time for it to be removed. We have a few of these cardboard cutouts wrapped in foil laying around. Each with different shapes of bridges. I guess you could say this repair happens A Lot… This is used to shield the top and reflect light and heat away from the top except in the bridge area where we want to heat up the glue.

 The Heat is on…

The Heat is on…

 Success! This isn’t the first time the bridge has been removed on this one. At one point in time some wood underneath the bridge was torn out and patches were grafted in. We can also see this isn’t the original bridge as the original bridge pins sat farther back on the original bridge. No doubt this guitar has seen a number of crack repairs as well. All of the crack you see here have been previously repaired. A little clean up with the chisel, and then it’s time to glue it back up.

Success! This isn’t the first time the bridge has been removed on this one. At one point in time some wood underneath the bridge was torn out and patches were grafted in. We can also see this isn’t the original bridge as the original bridge pins sat farther back on the original bridge. No doubt this guitar has seen a number of crack repairs as well. All of the crack you see here have been previously repaired. A little clean up with the chisel, and then it’s time to glue it back up.

IMG_4199.JPG
 Steve’s favorite bridge plate clamping call, the hockey puck does it’s job along side a couple wooden cauls to protect the X-Bracing.

Steve’s favorite bridge plate clamping call, the hockey puck does it’s job along side a couple wooden cauls to protect the X-Bracing.

 All cleaned up, a new set of strings and set up, and it’s good to go!

All cleaned up, a new set of strings and set up, and it’s good to go!